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Ki Sisa: Mercy or Pity? ~ Rabbi Reuven Chaim Klein

Founding Editor at Veromemanu
Rabbi Reuven Chaim Klein is a known scholar, respected author, and long-time member of the Kollel of Yeshivas Mir in Jerusalem. Reuven Chaim lives with his family in Beitar Illit, Israel.
Reuven Chaims' articles also appear weekly on ohr.edu and on https://ohr.edu/this_week/whats_in_a_word/ and in the Jewish Press.

To partner with Veromemanu consider a secure donation at: https://bit.ly/2QrDWRd
Reuven Chaim Klein

As Moshe prayed to G-d to forgive the Jewish People for sinning at the golden calf, G-d revealed to Moshe His Thirteen Attributes of Mercy. Those attributes are key to understanding how G-d runs the world, and how one can attain atonement/forgiveness for sins. Although we generally refrain from using adjectives to describe Gd, these Thirteen Attributes are presented as such. … Continue reading Ki Sisa: Mercy or Pity? ~ Rabbi Reuven Chaim Klein

Yom Kippur: Degrees of Sin ~ Rabbi Reuven Chaim Klein

Founding Editor at Veromemanu
Rabbi Reuven Chaim Klein is a known scholar, respected author, and long-time member of the Kollel of Yeshivas Mir in Jerusalem. Reuven Chaim lives with his family in Beitar Illit, Israel.
Reuven Chaims' articles also appear weekly on ohr.edu and on https://ohr.edu/this_week/whats_in_a_word/ and in the Jewish Press.

To partner with Veromemanu consider a secure donation at: https://bit.ly/2QrDWRd
Reuven Chaim Klein

Throughout the Yom Kippur services we repeatedly confess our sins and beg for forgiveness. In doing so, we mimic the confessionals of the Kohen Gadol in the Holy Temple. The Mishnah (Yoma 4:2) relates that when the Kohen Gadolwould confess his sins and the sins of his household, he would specifically admit to three types of sins: chet, avon, and pesha. These … Continue reading Yom Kippur: Degrees of Sin ~ Rabbi Reuven Chaim Klein

Terumah/Yom Kippur: To Cover up or to Clean Up, That is the Question ~ Yehoshua Steinberg

Founding Director, Editor-In-Chief at Veromemanu
Yehoshua (Jeremy) Steinberg is the Founding Director and Editor-in-chief of Veromemanu and it' website BiblicalHebrewEtymology.com.

Yehoshua is a retired U.S. Army Chaplain and currently lives in Israel with his wife and children.

To partner with Veromemanu consider a secure donation at: https://bit.ly/2QrDWRd
Yehoshua (Jeremy) Steinberg
Latest posts by Yehoshua (Jeremy) Steinberg (see all)

Article abstract: Parashat Terumah acutely delineates the makeup and measurements of the Tabernacle and its components, such as the Holy Ark and the Sacrificial Altar. But if it is important for one studying the intricacies of trees not to lose sight of the forest, how much more so should one analyzing the legal minutiae of the Sanctuary be sure to step back and ponder its fundamental purpose: atonement. The word for atonement in Hebrew is כפרה, but other words in the Holy Tongue bear this general meaning as well, such as סליחה and מחילה. What then is the unique import and mechanism of expiation represented by the word כפרה? This week's article examines the disparate derivatives of the root כפר, and delves into a fascinating dispute between Rashi and Ibn Ezra regarding its core meaning, and ultimately what the actual goal of atonement is.

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